Walk Spirit Talk Spirit Performed by McCoy Tyner Trio Plus Sax

This video clip features bandleader McCoy Tyner on piano, Eric Kamau Gravatt on drums, Gerald Cannon on the accoustic bass and guest saxophone player Gary Bartz on the alto saxophone.
McCoy Tyner is one of the most impressive jazz piano players with a musical background that includes playing with the legendary tenor saxophone master John Coltrane. The John Coltrane Quartet with McCoy Tyner on piano, Jimmy Garrison on bass and Elvin Jones on drums has recorded some of the best known jazz standard tunes of music history, among them My Favourite Things.
In this video, McCoy Tyner is an old guy who plays with maturity and taste while providing an interesting harmonic base for the imporvisations of Gary Bartz on the alto saxophone. The double bass solo by Gerald Cannon is also very interesting. Funny, it reminds me the classic hard rock song Smoke on the Water by Deep Purple in some parts.
This video only shows the first nine and a half minutes of the song, you can go to youtube and look for the second part which lasts about another four and a half minutes and includes a drum solo by Eric Kamau Gravatt.

The Kronos Quartet Performing the Jimi Hendrix Tune Foxy Lady

This video features the Kronos Quartet performing a classic Jimi Hendrix song called Foxy Lady. The Kronos Quartet is a musical ensemble of four young musicians who play string instruments. They all have studied a classical concert music instrumentalist career but have joined in this quartet with the goal to perform not only the repertoir of typical concert music string quartets. Instead, they are also performing compositions and arrangements from other musical environments besides the mandatory classical set of compositions.
In this little clip they have chosen a piece by rock star and electric guitar playing pioneer Jimi Hendrix called Foxy Lady. This is not the only piece of Jimi Hendrix interpreted by the Kronos Quartet, they also perform his tune Purple Haze (and maybe some more, so far I’ve found the two mentioned ones on youtube).
Jimi Hendrix was the most important rock guitar player of his time and has contributed strongly to the evolution of the possibilities of the electric guitar sound. He is well known for his appearance on the Woodstock festival where he performed the Star Spangled Banner, the north american national anthem, in his very own style, being a part of the love and peace movement and producing sounds with his guitar that imitated the falling american bombs over Vietnam.

A Saxophone Quartet Performing A Night In Tunesia

This video clip shows a saxophone quartet performing the Dizzy Gillespie bebop tune A Night in Tunesia at Palmer Square in Princeton, New Jersey, on Aug 11, 2007. This saxophone quartet consists of Rob Stasolla on one of the alto saxes, Scott Grimaldi on the other alto saxophone, Frank Elmo on tenor saxophone and last but not least Tom Makoviecki on baritone saxophone.
The song was originallly written for another group with different instruments, first of all it was conceived for the trumpet of the great Dizzy Gillespie on the solo parts. The art of adapting a musical piece written for a certain combination of instruments to another combination of different instruments is called arranging. This tune had to be adapted for the saxophone quartet and the resulting arrangement sounds interesting. Of course, there still are solo parts for improvisation where the musicians can play whatever they feel fits into the chord changes, a process that Bill Evans once called the creative process of composing jazz music.

Tenor Saxophone Giant Sonny Rollins and Guitar Legend Jim Hall Performing The Bridge

Watch this video with the great jazz tenor saxophone player Sonny Rollins playing his composition The Bridge and being accompanied by Jim Hall on guitar, Bob Cranshaw on bass and Ben Riley on drums. This tune is written and performen in up tempo which is a challenge for all musicians. However, these giants here have no problem with the speed and it’s a delight to listen to them and watch them executing the most difficult passages without hesitation …
Sonny Rollins is one of the greatest saxophone players ever and we invite you to participate in our poll regarding the best saxophone player known to mankind. Of course we know that it is very difficult to decide who is the better player when you have to choose between Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Michael Brecker and other tenor saxophone legends. More than establishing the better player, our poll is about taste and preferences of our readers, you even might consider some unknown or not mentioned sax player as the one you like best … Go and vote!

Milt Jackson Quartet Performing The Rev Live in Japan

Watch this video with the legendary vibraphone player Milt Jackson performing his composition The Rev live on stage in Japan. In this concert from 1990 he is being accompanied by Mickey Roker, Mike LeDonne and Ira Coleman.
Milt Jackson gained world popularity when playing with The Modern Jazz Quartet and is one of the best vibraphone player of the planet. The quartet here sounds great and the combination of piano, bass, drums and vibraphone results in a smooth jazz sound. The music played here shows some cool swing and is easy to enjoy, even for people who usually don’t listen to jazz music. However, there still is a great deal of improvisation in this performance.
The vibraphone is an instrument usually played with mallets. Notice that Milt Jackson is using his own mallets for playing the instrument.

Black Sabbath Performing their Superhit Paranoid

This video shows the famous british hard rock and heavy metal band Black Sabbath performing their greatest hit called Paranoid. This band appeared on the music scene in 1968 under the name of Polka Tulk Blues Band, and rapidly became very popular, landing several hits in the top ten charts of the time. The band’s original line up counted with Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler , Tony Iommi and Bill Ward. Black Sabbath has been an influence to bands like Pantera, Megadeth, Motorhead, Judas Priest, Soundgarden, Slayer or Metallica have continued the dark style of Black Sabbath.
The band forced Ozzy Osbourne to leave in 1979 due to problems related to drug addiction. Black Sabbath however did continue to play concerts with different musicians as group members, until the year of 1997 when the band had its comeback with the original members. This group played from 1997 to 2006.
An interesting detail is that the guitar player of the group suffered an accident while working in a factory. This incident cost him two fingers but he used some plastic from old bottles as prothesis. In order to play the guitar he had to lower the tension of the strings, changing the standard tuning to one that allowed him to continue with his musical career. Since the bass player of the group adopted the same tuning, the specific dark sound of Black Sabbath was born.

Ben Webster Performing the Song Perdido along with the Oscar Peterson Trio

Watch this video clip with the great tenor saxophone player Ben Webster improvising over the chord changes of the song Perdido. Some time ago, we have posted the same song performed by another jazz legend: Sarah Vaughan, go and listen to this version too, then compare and try to find out who you like better.
The group Ben Webster is playing with here is the Oscar Peterson Trio.
Ben Webster was born in Kansas City, Missouri. He started playing the saxophone in the early 20s of the past century and learned a lot from the inmortal Coleman Hawkins. Ben Webster has played with the bands and groups of Bennie Moten, Cab Calloway, Fletcher Henderson, and many others. Ben Webster’s favourite pieces are the jazz ballads, despite his excellent performances with the Duke Ellington Orchestra where he frequently performed up-tempo compositions with great improvisations. Ben Webster passed away in 1973.
As always when we present an important tenor saxophone jazz player, we invite you to participate in our poll and vote about the most important tenor sax jazz musician.

Joe Henderson Performing Take the A Train on Tenor Saxophone

Jazz music fans know that Joe Henderson is one of the most important tenor saxophone players ever. In this video you can watch the jazz legend performing the classic jazz composition Take the A Train by Duke Ellington. Joe Henderson is the band leader and plays the tenor saxophone while Bheki Mseleku is on piano, George Mraz on bass and Al Foster on drums.
The tune they play is a well known theme and thousands of jazz piano players and other jazz musicians have played it and improvised over the changes. Among the people who have performed or recorded this song are Ella Fitzgerald, Dave Brubeck, Oscar Peterson, Charles Mingus, Anita O’Day and many others. It also is one of the first pieces that jazz music students are using for developing their improvisation skills. If you like to listen to different versions of this song, feel free to visit this page with videos of famous jazz musicians performing Take the A Train.
As always when we post about a tenor saxophone player, we invite you to participate in our poll about the greatest tenor sax player ever. There you can vote for one of our candidates or suggest your own candidate. It’s a tough competition, but who knows?

Branford Marsalis Quartet Performing Yes and No by Wayne Shorter

Watch this video with the Branford Marsalis Quartet performing the song Yes or No, an original composition by Wayne Shorter that appeared on the LP JuJu on the label Blue Note Records in 1964. Branford Marsalis is one of the greatest tenor saxophone players ever. Whenever he plays you will notice the influence the legendary Bebop sax player John Coltrane has caused over the following generations of jazz musicians, especially over the tenor saxophonists.
On this record Branford Marsalis is accompanied by Jeff ‘Tain’ Watts on the drums who is really heating up things and provides a solid speedy base for the solos of Branford Marsalis on tenor saxophone and Kenny Kirkland on piano, while Robert Hurst is playing the accoustic bass. Our personal point of view almost always rates original recordings higher, so you might want to check out the mentioned Blue Note Records LP JuJu with the composer of this song called Yes or No, Wayne Shorte, on saxophone and accompanied by piano legend McCoy Tyner on piano, Elvin Jones on the drums and Reggie Workman on bass. Notice that McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones belonged to the original John Coltrane Quartet.
We have no doubt that the original version is ‘better’, but who cares? This is a live performance of a really good and hot jazz quartet and sounds very cool, see how the musicians enjoy their working. We just want to give the credit for composing this song to Wayne Shorter, but that doesn’t mean we greatly enjoy this version by Branford Marsalis and his band.
As always when we post about a tenor saxophone player, we invite you to participate in our poll about the greatest tenor sax player ever.
Branford Marsalis comes out of a family of important jazz musicians and began to play with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers as well as with his brother’s band, the Wynton Marsalis Quintet. In the meanwhile he has played with a lot of jazz ‘monsters’ including Sonny Rollins, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie and Herbie Hancock. We strongly recommend you to watch out for more videos and records of this modern jazz legend.

Beijing Classical Music Ensemble Performing an Old Tune

This video shows the Bejing Classical Music Ensemble playing an old song on traditional instruments. It is a quartet and the song is an old melody composed for these instruments. The concept of chinese music is quite different from western music, even though in recent times, the globalization has a strong impact on the chinese music scene. Now you can listen to a big bunch of singers performing pop music which sounds like any other modern pop song, just with chinese lyrics. The chinese national identity disappears and the product is complying with the need for almost identical stuff that can satisfy the ‘needs’ of millions of potential buyers from all around the world.
This ensemble, however, performs traditional music with traditional chinese instruments. Some comments for this video clip of chinese music mention a too high pitch and the lack of an counter-melody. That’s just not the way chinese music was composed. In chinese music tonality is not that important as rhythm and rhythmical coincidence is release, not harmonic coincidence as in western music. We think that all people regardless of their cultural identity can perceive the joyfull character of the song in this video.