Siouxsie and the Banshees Happy House Video Clip

Siouxsie & the Banshees is a rock band that appeared in 1976 in the United Kingdom ans was formed by lead singer Siouxsie Sioux. In their first appearances in public it seemed that the band belonged to the punk music scene, however, soon it became clear that Souxsie was not willy to limit herself and the group to straight punk rock. They began to experiment with rhythm and sounds, so that the famous London newspager The Times referred to Siouxsie and the Banshees as “one of the most audacious and uncompromising musical adventurers of the post-punk era.”
Later, Siouxsie and the Banshees served as an inspiration for the creators of gothic rock, but also for some pop and avantgarde groups and singers.
Siouxsie and the Banshees disappeared from the music scene in 1995 when Siouxsie felt like the group wasn’t going anywhere anymore. The band broke up and Siouxsie now acts with The Creatures.

Black Sabbath Performing their Superhit Paranoid

This video shows the famous british hard rock and heavy metal band Black Sabbath performing their greatest hit called Paranoid. This band appeared on the music scene in 1968 under the name of Polka Tulk Blues Band, and rapidly became very popular, landing several hits in the top ten charts of the time. The band’s original line up counted with Ozzy Osbourne, Geezer Butler , Tony Iommi and Bill Ward. Black Sabbath has been an influence to bands like Pantera, Megadeth, Motorhead, Judas Priest, Soundgarden, Slayer or Metallica have continued the dark style of Black Sabbath.
The band forced Ozzy Osbourne to leave in 1979 due to problems related to drug addiction. Black Sabbath however did continue to play concerts with different musicians as group members, until the year of 1997 when the band had its comeback with the original members. This group played from 1997 to 2006.
An interesting detail is that the guitar player of the group suffered an accident while working in a factory. This incident cost him two fingers but he used some plastic from old bottles as prothesis. In order to play the guitar he had to lower the tension of the strings, changing the standard tuning to one that allowed him to continue with his musical career. Since the bass player of the group adopted the same tuning, the specific dark sound of Black Sabbath was born.

The Day of Silence and Other New Years Day Celebrations from around the World

All over the globe there are celebrations when a year ends and a new cycle begins. The change dosn’t necessarily happen on december 31 / January 1, as in the western world. In Ubud, Bali (Indonesia), the celebrations take place in march, when the new year for the hindus begins.
Bali is a country full of music. It is a society where music is always present: when the fields are harvested, there is a music group of the town playing while other members of the community cut the fruits or whatever they are harvesting. The same thing happens when the community plants the seeds for the new agricultural cycle and in general terms there is no event in the life of the people from Bali where there wouldn’t be a musical group playing.
At the last day of the year, the people from Bali bring out giant paper monsters that symbolize the evil in multiple presentations and forms. In the night, the paper monsters are brought back to where they were built and remain there for one day. This day is the day of silence and there is absolutely no action on the streets or in the houses. People meditate and rest, stying home since no traffic is allowed on the streets. No cars, no motorcycles and not even pedestrians.
The idea behind this tradition is that on this day the evil spirits will visit the island and when they see the paper monsters and the empty streets they will think that the monsters already have taken over the island and that there are no persons left. So, they will go back to where they came from and will let the land in peace for another year.
That would be a nice tradition to introduce in the western world!

Sheet Music Animation Giant Steps by Tenor Sax Legend John Coltrane

This video is an excellent didactical approach to the tenor saxophone solo playing of John Coltrane. It shows the musical notes pregressively appearing on the screen as they are played by John Coltrane. The synchronisation between images and sound is marvellous and helps the saxophone student to learn the phrasing of this solo. In our opinion, this is the best didactical method we have ever seen, not only for the saxophone learners but for all musicians. Of course, if you are talented enough to learn such a solo just by ear, you have an enormous advantage, but we are sure that there are only a very few musicians out there who can achieve this.
The piece itself is regarded as difficult to learn, especially because of the up tempo speed and the unusual distance of a third of the tonal centers in the structure of the piece.
In the future we will also post a video clip that shows a robot playing this legendary solo. Look out for this post and if you like watch more videos with John Coltrane and listen to more of his music, you can visit the fiesta-musical.com site. On this blog we have also posted an interview from 1960 with John Coltrane, the legendary jazz giant.

The Chemical Brothers play Surface to Air – Pop Style Experimental Music

This is a music video with the electronic music of the Chemical Brothers who are performing their song Surface to Air. Electronic music is a term with different concepts associated to it: basically we refer to electronic music as modern concert music in the academic style but also to a rapidly increasing number of pop music bands and pieces.
In the beginning of the electronic music era, the sounds were produced experimentally and by huge machines. Karheinz Stockhausen was one of the first composers who experimented with electronically produced sounds, which weren’t necessarily sounds produced by synthesizers. Different composition methods were used to enrich the classical techniques. One possibility was to cut parts of recorded music (which could be conventional music) and rearrange the pieces of tape into arbitrary orders, obtaining surprising result which were not always wellcome by the audiences. Some portions of the tapes even were put together reversed, sounding from the end to the beginning. Nowadays this can be achieved through a simply clic in almost any modern music composition compute software.
On the other hand, at the beginning of electronic music it seemed to be interesting just to obtain naturally sounding synthesized instruments. Music instruments included sound banks with synthesized violins, guitars, trumpets and all the other conventional instruments. And some of the synthesized voices sounded and still sound great, perfectly imitating the original instruments’ sounds.
The development of electronics has made it possible to pack a whole symphony orchestra into a portable keyboard. The resulting type of synthesizers with sound banks of this kind would have been a nice thing to have for the classical composers like Bach or Mozart and the rest and allow modern academic composers to compose with the voices of the different orchestra sections.
We wouldn’t call the corresponding music experimental music which involves new sounds beyond the traditional material for composers. Here enter new methods and techniques for synthesis and assembling, for example the approach of the greek architect and composer Ianis Xenakis who invented an instrument which could be used to transform drawings into music, to mention just one example of new composition techniques.
Then, electronic music became a part of the progessive rock music bands’ repertoire. It was popularized by bands like Pink Floyd and many others who integrated sound effects into their songs, or by bands and artists like Tangerine Dream or Mike Oldfield, for example, who performed music based almost completely on synthesizers. The Chemical Brothers followed this direction and became popular more than 20 years after the first bands introduced electronic compositions, many of them using serial composition methods.
We are aware that this is only a rough introduction to electronic music and we invite you to use the tag cloud and categories of this blog to learn more about this kind of music. You might also want to visit a page about experimental music with examples of new invented music instruments and other experimental approaches.
To finish this article we just want to mention that experimental music hasn’t necessarily to do with electronic music, there are other possibilities, for example transforming objects well known from our usual environment into musical artifacts. Keep looking around and listen to as much different kinds of music as possible, not everything will mean a pleasure to you but some extra-academic and modern compositions will be of interest for you.

Are Video Blogs Going to Stay Alive or Will Copyright Infringement Claims Kill File Sharing on Youtube?

This post will deal about publishing, republishing and copyright. Due to recent limitations of youtube video insertion into our posts, it has become a necessity to post about this issue even though it is slightly off topic regarding the central purpose of this blog which is to contribute to the presentation of the variety of music beyond the standardized music played by the vast majority of tv and radio stations around the globe.
Youtube has developed into an important communication channel with a lot of videos posted daily by users from many countries and regions of the world. Here internet surfers will find a huge archieve of video clips about many issues and a considerable part of these videos deal with music and musicians beside other aspects of the entertainment business and other fields of interest.
The Music Video Guide was created with the idea to help people navigate this immense quantity of videos published and republished on youtube and other video blog platforms and other internet sites. Our purpose was and is to publish or republish a video clip and comment it so that the reader could have a point of departure for the personal evaluation or the corresponding music video and we were very disappointed when about 10 minutes after publishing our post about an interpretation of ‘Der Hölle Rache’ from ‘The Magic Flute’ (‘Die Zauberflöte’) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the video didn’t show up any more on our blog. Instead there was a short line saying something like ‘Sorry, this video is no longer available’. We inmediately visited the youtube site to learn that in the text fiel which usually contains the code for embedding the video into blogs and other websites there was this laconic line of text: “video insertion disabled by petition”.
This ment a lot of frustration to us. We believe that things like that should not happen and are avoidable. For example if the youtube system would offer the possibility to disable the video embedding at and let’s say within the next 15 minutes after publishing time. Then we could save our efforts of investigating and commenting and focus on other videos whose publishers or republishers aren’t governed by envy or greed but by the sane intention to bring good stuff to the general public’s attention.
Anyway, the Music Video Guide continued with it’s publishing scheme of a video with the corresponding comments and everything went fine for a while until our last post which was about the first movement of the Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69, by Ludwig van Beethoven performed by the marvellous piano player Glenn Gould and the cellist Leonard Rose and recorded around 1960. This time it took only a day to see that the republisher of this video clip had solicited the disallowment of embedding of the clip into other sites.
The preceding lines are about the why of this post, now let’s get into substance.
According to the republisher of this video on youtube, it is extracted from “The Glenn Gould Collection: VOLUME 8 – Interweaving Voices” (Sony SHV 48412, VHS, NTSC). We are strongly convinced that this youtube publisher didn’t upload the video on behalf of Sony who seems to be the copyright holder, as far as we can deduce from the information provided and will do a little research about the authorisation for uploading on youtube, among some other actions related to this incident.
The easiest thing would be to download this video from youtube which is very easy if you have installed Realplayer or other similar software and then upload it on our own account so that we could embed it pointing to our own upload.
However, at uploading time youtube show a copyright notice, telling you to not upload anything which isn’t your work or public domain. Now, we could edit the video a little bit, to comply with the rule of utilization of only a certain percentage of original material and make it “ours”. Or we could argue that since the mentioned video only represents the first movemento of three of the Cello Sonata No. 3, this is already sliced down to comply with this kind of rule (note: correction subject to detail investigation regarding varying national and international legislations).
But maybe, the youtube republisher (http://www.youtube.com/user/inwit) considers that this video clip is already reduced in size and quality in comparison with the original Sony VHS tape and that this fact is enough to not infringe the rights of copyright holder Sony. We will find out and would appreciate your comments regarding the issue.

Frank Zappa Performing Inca Roads with some Original Claymation and Overdubs

This video clip shows Frank Zappa performing Inca Roads live on stage and has some fantastic claymation (= animation with clay) work included. The noises from the claymation part seem to bother some people on youtube, however, this is great work and worth listening to. If you don’t get it the first time, listen to it again! We’re sure you will fully appreciate it after a couple of times listening. Frank Zappa is accompanied here by Ian and Ruth Underwood on the vibraphone, George Duke on piano, Chester Thompson on drums and Napoleon Murphy Brock on flute and tenor saxophone. There should be no doubt about the musical quality of this video though. Zappa was always experimenting and open to discover new horizons and this yuxtaposition of the live performance and the claymation is a great example of it. The animation was added by Frank Zappa personally to the live gig from 1974 and originally appears on the Dub Room Special video. Those of the listeners who don’t like the sound effects of the claymation overdubbed on the live show should either respect Frank Zappa’s will or write their own music, I would like to see if they can do better in terms of original creativity which were some of Zappa’s most important and characteristic propperties. Of course, our society is designed to hate originality and creativity and trained to listen to crap like Britney Spears or Thalia, precisely because this kind of ‘stars’ don’t do anything original or creative, they just repeat standard approved formulas that fit into any living room form Chicago to Tokio without questioning the validity of these formulas in musical and much more in artistic terms. Lullabies for the working masses, keeping them brainwahedly doped. Does anybody remember Frank Zappa’s great and always entertaining stuff about the brain police on his first albums?
Frank Zappa was, in the first place, an artist. It is incredible to see how the clay figures change their appearance over and over again, how things flow, just like ever changing reality where the only stable thing is change itself.
If you like to watch more videos and music of Frank Zappa, please visit http://www.fiesta-musical.com/english/Frank-Zappa.php.