Australian Aboriginal Music Performed on the Didgeridoo

This video clip shows an aborgin from Australia playing the typical instrument of this region of the planet: the didgeridoo. The didgeridoo produces an unique sound while the instrument itself remembers some horns played by people from other countries.
The players produce very long droning tones on this horn which is achieved by a technique called circular breathing. Circular breathing is used by musicians from different musical environments, for example by jazz trumpet and saxophone players.
The australian population counts with different tribes and each tribe has its own religious rules regarding the playing of this sacred instrument. While some tribes allow all members to play the didgeridoo, others don’t let their women play it and still others don’t allow children to play it.
The didgeridoo has made its way to the modern music environment and there are many recordings of didgeridoo sounds belonging to world music, trance, techno and other modern music styles.

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Kongar-ol Ondar Performing Throat Singing together with Bela Fleck and the Flecktones

This video clip shows an amazing singer from Mongolia called Kongar-ol Ondar who is performing some incredible vocal music: in some parts of the tune he sings three notes together. And there are no overdubs or playback! He is performing together with Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, but on this particular song he is singing a capella (which means vocal music or singing without accompaniment). Kongar-ol Ondar doesn’t need any accompaniment because he acompanies himself with his other voices. lol.
This technique is called throat singing and originally comes from the russian republic of Tuva, the technique is also practised by the people from Mongolia. It seems to be difficult to learn it, teachers say that it takes about 10 minutes to explain it and lots of hours of practice.
Bela Fleck and the Flecktones have been playing for over 14 years now, performing shows in genres like bluegrass, jazz and fusion. Bela Fleck himself plays the electric banjo and the group likes to be creative. They never play the same show twice in a row and like to bring in new elements like they do here with the throat singing of Kongar-ol Ondar.
If you like to listen to more throat singing and vocal music videos, feel free to visit this page with more examples.