Ionisation by Edgar Varese Performed by the Ensemble InterContemporain

Watch this video with Pierre Boulez conducting the Ensembe InterContemporain for a performance of Edgar Varese’s (1883 – 1965) composition Ionisation. The music involves many percussion instruments and some rare music instruments like the siren and the lion’s roar which you can listen to as a solo instrument at 1:15 of the video clip and as part of the orchestra at 3:08. This particular version of the instrument is suspended and the performer pulls down from beneath on a string attached to the middle of the drum head.
Not only did Varese experiment with new instruments but also integrated electronic resources into his compositions, for example on the 1958 World Fair when he wrote his Poème électronique as part of the pavilion Philips had commissioned to Le Corbusier. The piece was presented over 400 speakers located in a series of rooms, with the effect that the visitors could listen to the changing sound as they moved through the rooms. This and other experiments with electronic resources gained him the nickname “Father of Electronic Music” (which is a little bit exaggerated considering composers like Karlheiz Stockhausen and many others who actually used electronically produced and synthesized sounds in their compositions) while Henry Miller described him as “The stratospheric Colossus of Sound”. However, ther can’t be no doubt about the quality of the compositions of Edgar Varese.
Some people say that this particular recording is performed much to fast, but as far as the composer is concerned he wrote no number for beats per minute, instead he left the space empty on the sheet music.
Edgar Varese was also one of the most important influences for modern music composer and rock guitar player Frank Zappa, check out the music by this legendary musician and you will clearly hear the influence of the french composer in Frank’s music.

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Frank Zappa performing Stairway to Heaven in a Cover Version of this Original Led Zeppelin Song

This video shows one of the rare ocasions with Frank Zappa performing a cover version of a song composed by other artists, in this case by the famous rock band Led Zeppelin. The cover is pretty close to the original music, which means the song is fully recognizable by anyone, however it has Frank Zappa’s personal stamp on it. The band of Frank Zappa in this ocasion is composed of about ten musicians while the Led Zeppelin band counted with only four musicians. The main difference is that Frank Zappa’s band has a brass section which fits perfectly into the song. The arrangement was of course done by the bandleader and includes some extra guitar notes in the quiet introduction of the piece as well as some other notes and noises produced by the members of the group. It sounds funny and I think the performance of this song illustrated that humour does belong in music. If you like to watch more videos with music performed by Frank Zappa, you can click his name in our tag cloud or you might want to visit the fiesta-musical.com website where you can find more videos with music performed by Frank Zappa, interviews with him and some domcumentary video material related to this important (rock) musician of the 20th century. You might also want to listen to Led Zeppelin playing Stairway to Heaven in its original version.

Frank Zappa Performing Inca Roads with some Original Claymation and Overdubs

This video clip shows Frank Zappa performing Inca Roads live on stage and has some fantastic claymation (= animation with clay) work included. The noises from the claymation part seem to bother some people on youtube, however, this is great work and worth listening to. If you don’t get it the first time, listen to it again! We’re sure you will fully appreciate it after a couple of times listening. Frank Zappa is accompanied here by Ian and Ruth Underwood on the vibraphone, George Duke on piano, Chester Thompson on drums and Napoleon Murphy Brock on flute and tenor saxophone. There should be no doubt about the musical quality of this video though. Zappa was always experimenting and open to discover new horizons and this yuxtaposition of the live performance and the claymation is a great example of it. The animation was added by Frank Zappa personally to the live gig from 1974 and originally appears on the Dub Room Special video. Those of the listeners who don’t like the sound effects of the claymation overdubbed on the live show should either respect Frank Zappa’s will or write their own music, I would like to see if they can do better in terms of original creativity which were some of Zappa’s most important and characteristic propperties. Of course, our society is designed to hate originality and creativity and trained to listen to crap like Britney Spears or Thalia, precisely because this kind of ‘stars’ don’t do anything original or creative, they just repeat standard approved formulas that fit into any living room form Chicago to Tokio without questioning the validity of these formulas in musical and much more in artistic terms. Lullabies for the working masses, keeping them brainwahedly doped. Does anybody remember Frank Zappa’s great and always entertaining stuff about the brain police on his first albums?
Frank Zappa was, in the first place, an artist. It is incredible to see how the clay figures change their appearance over and over again, how things flow, just like ever changing reality where the only stable thing is change itself.
If you like to watch more videos and music of Frank Zappa, please visit http://www.fiesta-musical.com/english/Frank-Zappa.php.

National Treasure Frank Zappa performing live on stage

Frank Zappa and his band are performing the song City of Tiny Lights on this video. All the members of the band show their instrumental skills and offer an exceptional performance of musicianship. As always, Frank Zappa plays the guitar in his very personal style, soloing and throwing in some short notes from time to time.
If you would like to listen to more of Frank Zappa’s music we invite you to visit the fiesta-musical.com website where you can find more videos of Frank Zappa performing and interviewed. This site also offers videos of other performers like jazz musicians, rock bands, classical music performers both lieve on stage and in interviews as well as in documentary videos. Get a good insight into the entertainment business.

Frank Zappa Ronald Reagan Hairdress and Documentary Video

This video shows Frank Zappa at work in different situations ranging from the making of a music video to working with a 25 performers symphony orchestra that is putting on stage his compositions. It has some interesting parts about the appearance of Ronald Reagan’s hairdress in the mentioned clip. For people interested in more of Frank Zappa’s work: go and visit http://www.fiesta-musical.com where you will find video clips of Frank Zappa playing his music, interviews and appearances on tv shows

Frank Zappa – ‘Stinkfoot’

Watch this video of Frank Zappa playing his song ‘Stinkfoot’ with Ruth Underwood on vibraphone and some interesting animations around the end of the videoclip. As always with Frank Zappa you get really amused, starting with the song’s title and lyrics, passing for his extremly structured music and amazing images of the animations, especially if you consider that this animation was done in the seventies, long time before computer animation got popular.
You can also appreciate Frank Zappa’s guitar playing and see the beginnings of rap in the vamp style performance which of course is spiced with highly difficult instrument and rhythm parts.

Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention

Watch Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention perform live on stage in the early sixties. This kind of music was not very popular at the time nor is it in our days. However, this type of music is much more interesting than most of the modern ‘songs’. The musician sure have fun and the resulting music is an surprising mix of accoustic events.
It could be regarded as Free Jazz too, but especially with this sort of ‘songs’ the name doesn’t really matter. The words are only aproximations to the real things. Nevertheless, one can talk about the music, and talking about Frank Zappa’s music certainly is talking about freedom: freedom of speech and freedom of musical composition.
If you want to learn more about music, then the music of Frank Zappa sure is a good starting point since he has a very extense discography and his compositions range from country style songs and contemporary chamber music to punk rock and rap. All with his very personal style.
Observe the integration of almost any kind of artifact as a musical instrument, e.g. the small plastic bottle that produces sounds held in front of the microphone in the minutes of the music video shown here.