Pat Metheny Trio Performing Lonely Woman by Horace Silver

This video shows the Pat Metheny Trio performing the Horace Silver tune Lonely Woman in a concert from 1999.

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The Arne Jansen Trio Performing On the Shore

In this video clip you can see and listen to the Arne Jansen Trio performing the tune On the Shore live on stage. Arne Jansen plays the electric guitar, Eva Kruse is playing the double bass and Eric Schaefer is performing on drums. The song is in a quiet mood with an melancholic feel. Just as the title says, it could be a day on the shore, have the ocean in front of you, get calm with the huge amount of water and the endless rolling waves, maybe some birds flying in the air, a boat or two passing by, just a day On the Shore.
It is remarkable how these great musicians can play such a quiet piece, most listeners won’t appreciate their skills, everybody is expecting them to show what they can do.
However, musicality or musical talent certainly doesn’t have much to do with virtuousity, virtuousity sometimes even kills musicality just because the musician has to perform extra fast runs on his instruments, play them smoothly and don’t make any ‘mistakes’, don’t leave out notes, play wrong notes or anything that could be interpreted as evidence of his lack of talent. Many times, these fast parts don’t sound like music and the performers seem to be like secretaries who can type real fast, regardless of the content they are writing.

Lou Reed Singing Walk on the Wild Side and Interviewed by Australien Journalists

Watch this video with underground rock star Lou Reed performing his hit Walk on the Wild Side and being interviewed by the australian press. I think everybodey knows the tune since it has been aired by radio stations from all over the world for several decades now. It has a kind of minimalistic melody while in this version the guitar plays a little bit more than just the usual simple chord progression.
The interview is hilarious. Lou Reed limits himself to very short answers like ‘yes’, ‘no’, and ‘I don’t know’ and responding even in a contradictory way. He knows who he is and what he represents …

Holly came from miami f.l.a.
Hitch-hiked her way across the U.S.A.

Plucked her eyebrows on the way
Shaved her leg and then he was a she
She says, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
Said, hey honey, take a walk on the wild side

Candy came from out on the island
In the backroom she was everybodys darling

But she never lost her head
Even when she was given head
She says, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
Said, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
And the coloured girls go

Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo
Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo

Little Joe never once gave it away
Everybody had to pay and pay

A hustle here and a hustle there
New York city is the place where they said
Hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
I said hey Joe, take a walk on the wild side

Sugar plum fairy came and hit the streets
Lookin for soul food and a place to eat

Went to the Apollo
You should have seen him go go go
They said, hey sugar, take a walk on the wild side
I said, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
All right, huh

Jackie is just speeding away
Thought she was James Dean for a day

Then I guess she had to crash
Valium would have helped that dash
She said, hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
I said, hey honey, take a walk on the wild side
And the coloured girls say

Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo
Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo

Well, Lou Reed obvoiusly does some variations on the lyrics when performing live on stage, but his eventual alterations don’t really change the meaning of the song.

Blues Legend Big Bill Broonzy Performing Hey Hey

This video features the great blues guitar legend Big Bill Broonzy (born as William Lee Conley Broonzy) performing the tune Hey Hey. Even though Big Bill Broonzy is not very well known, he has recorded about 350 songs! The guitar player and singer gained a certain popularity with his small band as one of the first blues singers who included a bass and drums in his performances. The band was called Big Bill and his Chicago Five.
Big Bill Broonzy was born in the state of Missisipi in 1893 or 95 and lived until 1958. When he moved to Chicago, he began to play the guitar and soon began playing clubs and participating in recording sessions. His playing is in the folk blues tradition and despite the fact that in the 40s he had begun to experiment with the electric guitar, he returned to his classical picking style and singing, mostly because his audience wanted so because it seemed more authentic to them.
Big Bill Broonzy has recorded with musicians like Leadbelly, Pete Seeger, Brownie Mcghee and Sonny Terry, among others. He has been a source of inspiration to other blues giants as Muddy Waters and Memphis Slim.
In this video Big Bil Broonzy shows his personal picking style that the mostly white audiences wanted him to play.

Tenor Saxophone Giant Sonny Rollins and Guitar Legend Jim Hall Performing The Bridge

Watch this video with the great jazz tenor saxophone player Sonny Rollins playing his composition The Bridge and being accompanied by Jim Hall on guitar, Bob Cranshaw on bass and Ben Riley on drums. This tune is written and performen in up tempo which is a challenge for all musicians. However, these giants here have no problem with the speed and it’s a delight to listen to them and watch them executing the most difficult passages without hesitation …
Sonny Rollins is one of the greatest saxophone players ever and we invite you to participate in our poll regarding the best saxophone player known to mankind. Of course we know that it is very difficult to decide who is the better player when you have to choose between Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Michael Brecker and other tenor saxophone legends. More than establishing the better player, our poll is about taste and preferences of our readers, you even might consider some unknown or not mentioned sax player as the one you like best … Go and vote!

Guitar Players Attila Zoller and Jim Hall Perform Carefull

This video shows the guitar player duo Attila Zoller and Jim Hall performing the jazz tune Carefull on a show for the german television from 1973. It is a quiet piece and shows the exquisite musical taste of both guitar players as well as their well achieved musical understanding of each other.
Attila Zoller can be considered as one of the most important german jazz guitar players of post-war Germany, if not the best. We encourage you to look for other examples of his playing on youtube.
Jim Hall is also a well known guitar player and has performed with many international jazz musicians such as Barney Kessel, Bill Evans and Sonny Rollins, among others.

Bass Player Jaco Pastorious and Guitar Player John Scofield Performing The Chicken

This video shows two of the most important jazz musicians playing together in a studio session: we are talking about the legendary funky bass player Jaco Pastorious and guitar monster John Scofield. As for bass players there are musicians like Percy Jones, Linley Marthe, Mark King, Jeff Berlin, Ralphe Armstrong or Hadrien Feraud, to mention just a few. However, Jaco Pastorious is in my opinion the funkiest bass player, specially because of his slappy style which is now being copied by many younger bass players.
In this studio session John Scofield and Jaco Pastorious count with the drums of Kenwood Dennard. It is astounding how well Jaco’s bass lines go together with the bass drum, everything is in the pocket!
Unfortunately Jaco Pastorious was killed violently short time after this recording.
We also recommend to check for videos with Jaco Pastorious together with the jazz rock band Weather Report where he played most of his best performances.
In this video, Jaco is playing a bass with frets while in many other recordings he uses a fretless bass and produces some excellent solos with it. Here Jaco is playing mainly as part of the rhythm section which is his usual concept for the bass player while other ones consider the bass as an instrument as any other conventional solo instrument.