Rubinstein Performing Impromptu by Schubert

Watch this video with piano player Arthur Rubinstein performing the Impromptu Op. 90 No. 4 by german composer Franz Schubert. Even though Arthur Rubinstein was already 90 years old when he recorded this version of the Impromptu by Schubert, he still plays very well, I would say he finally plays it the best way he could, after such a long life of playing music, taste must have strongly evolved.

Philly Joe Jones Performing a Drum Solo

In this video you can see and listen to a drum solo performed by one of the early jazz drummers named Philly Joe Jones. The occasion this solo was played was on a concert of the Miles Davis Group. Philly Joe Jones has also played with the Sun Ra Orchestra.

Pink Floyd’s Song Wish You Were Here Guitar Lesson

Watch this video clip featuring the first part of four that help guitar players to learn this song on the guitar. The lesson will show you how to play everything, solo guitar and chords. The teacher is very pacient with his students and explains all details.
He shows us how to move the fingers of the left hand over the frets of the neck. It is of great help because it also shows the right strokes for the right hand. Of course, right hand and left hand roles depend on the individual player, most of the people play this way, but it might be the other way around.
Pink Floyd released this song on their album with the same title. This album became very popular and the song is one of the best known Pink Floyd songs among the younger people.
You will find the other three parts of the song on youtube.

Ivry Gitlis Performing the Violin Solo Sonata by Bela Bartok

This video shows Ivry Gitlis, a phenomenal violin player, performing Bela Bartok’s sonata for solo violin. Many people can’t afford this piece (and some more of the compositions written by Bela Bartok) and even think that the violin player is playing out of tune. This happens because this sonata for violin includes microtonalities which means that the composer’s material is not limited to the well known twelve tones of the tempered piano tuning but also include more tones in between the standard twelve notes. Here the space between one note and the following one on the piano is subdivided into more subtle intervals. Naturally this kind of tune cannot be played on an accoustic piano while some synthesizers and keyboards do have a ‘bend wheel’ which would allow to play this piece.
Bela Bartok can be regarded as the most important hungarian composer and has an extensive oevre with compositions for many kinds of symphonic and chamber orchestras as well as for solo instruments. He also put special emphasis on the percussion instruments. His works for piano Microcosmos and Macrocosmos are mandatory repertoire for the beginning and advanced classical piano performer. In these and other compositions Bela Bartok recovers many hungarian, romanian and other folk tunes, treating and integrating them into the concert music repertoire.

Saxophone Robot Performs Giant Steps Solo by John Coltrane

Watch this video here with a saxophone robot playing John Coltrane’s famous solo over his bebop tune Giant Steps. The song is in up tempo bu you might feel that this solo could be played a little bit faster. Well, there is another version of Giant Steps at a higher speed, 350 bpm to be exact.
Some people say that this solo sounds cold and unpersonal. While this can be admitted it is still amazing that a machine can actually play a saxophone and with a high grade of accuracy. This is not simply a synthesizer or a computer’s sound card that synthetically imitates the sound of a certain music instrument, instead it is a machine that produces an air stream which is directed into the mouthpiece of a tenor saxophone while some artificial hands move the keys of the instrument.
You might want to listen to Giant Steps with John Coltrane’s original sound from the Blue Note record Blue Train on the soundtrack while a computer generated video animation shows the melody written out as sheet music in real time.
Of course there is a difference in interpretation and John Coltrane sounds as human as a musican can sound. We like this video because it helps to illustrate the point of slight tempo variations throughout the performance of a song. This sould be considered by all the ‘musicians’ who insist on the objectivity of a metronomes pulse. Yes, it is true that some sheet music indicates a certain number for the beats per minute the piece should be performed with. However, the japanese robot does exactly this while in real musicians’ interpretations there might be slight variations of the speed. Of course we don’t want to encourage the musicians to play ‘easy’ parts with the indicated speed and slow down during the ‘difficult’ parts, but we want to encourage the performers to put their personal style into an interpretation and that this style should be ruled by the sense of balance and freedom.
We don’t think that this robot qualifies as a suggestion for our poll about the greatest tenor saxophone player ever heard, but it´s up to you to decide now..

Vals Venezolano No. 2 by Antonio Lauro Performed on Accoustic Guitar

This video clip shows the classical guitar piece Vals Venezolano No. 2 composed by Antonio Lauro and performed by Manuel van de Mosselaar, a german musician and music teacher. Antonio Lauro lived from 1917 until 1986 and is considered as one of the most important classical guitar composers from South America. He also worked with several choirs in his country and later became the direcor of the Venezuela symphony Orchestra.
The piece of the video is particulary beautifull and sometimes is called Andreina, a girl’s name, since all the valses of this composer have a girl’s name.
The Vals Venezolano No. 2 is regarded as a piece for guitar players with intermediate skills and should be practiced slowly first. Since it is a vals without any rubato or off time parts, there should be no problem with maintaining the rhythm.

Brahms’ Capriccio performed by Arthur Rubinstein the Great Master of Classical Piano

This video shows the great piano artist Arthur Rubinstein performing a classical composition by german composer Johannes Brahms, the Capriccio No. 2. Arthur Rubinstein is well known as an excellent piano player and discovers the inner structure of this capriccio for our ears. He plays the Capriccio No. 2 out of memory and was 86 years old when performing it for the recording this video. A few years later, Rubinstein got blind and couldn’t read music any more. However, he had already memorized a huge amount of compositions for piano solo and for different concert music orchestras.
Johannes Brahm is along with Luwig van Beethoven and Johan Sebastian Bach one of the most important german composers. These three composers are frequently recalled as the ‘3 Bs’ and each one of them has enriched the body of the classical music repertoire with many valuable pieces and compositions. This composition of Brahms, the Capriccio No. 2 is performed here by a great artist who plays it in his very personal and masterish style. We recommend our readers to look out for more music of this composer who on one side is a very classical composer but on the other side has also integrated some adventurous passages into his work that clearly show his interest in trascending the established limits of harmony and find new contextualizations for his melodies.

Rostropovich playing the Prelude of Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1

Mstislav Rostropovich is one of the great cello players of all times. His interpretations are well received among the classical music lovers, even though some of the people who like to listen to classical compositions like the Cello Suites composed by Johan Sebastian Bach prefer other performers, e.g., Yo Yo Ma or Pablo Cazals. We think that it is a matter of taste.
Watch this video with Mstislav Rostropovich performing the Prelude of the Cello Suite No. 1 and compare it to Yo Yo Ma’s performance. While Rostropovich plays the prelude in about 2 minutes while Yo Yo Ma slows it down about 25% resulting in a 2 minutes and a half performance. Personally, I prefer the faster version of the prelude.
Play this video clip and listen to the Cello Suite No. 1 in G major, which is included in the catalogue of Johan Sebastian Bach’s compositions under the number BWV 1007. The present footage was filmed at the Basilique Sainte Madeleine, Vézelay, Yvonne, France in 1991.
Since Johan Sebastian Bach did not include any indications about the performing details, it is supposed that this prelude should not be played with a slowing down effect on certain parts, which is one of the stylistic elements Yo Yo Ma uses almost anywhere. Since Bach didn’t annotate anything like this in his composition sheets, it should be played straight forward as Mstislav Rostropovich is doing it. He catches and expresses more of the original spirit of this composition.

Albert King – Born under a bad sign – Blues with much soul

Watch this video with black blues guitar player Albert King performing his song Born Under a Bad Sign. The arrangement includes a brass section wiith trumpets, trombones and saxophones. The clip has fair audio quality and presents one of the most important blues players with his band live on stage.
Albert King plays with a personal way of putting the strings of the guitar: he’s got the high e-string on the top (upside down) so he can play very cool bends. Listen to the blues guitar solos of Albert King whenever you can, he plays the traditional blues with a lot of soul, getting funky …
Blues musicians dont compare each other, they play the blues because they love it and they have something to say. They don’t want to be better than the other ones! Actually, this applies to almost all musicians. However, there are a few out there who pretend to be better than the rest, well being better than the rest of the guitar players for example still is a personal and therefor subjective point of view. Instead, musicians know that if they have something to say, they will be heard by their fellow musicians.

Sonny Rollins – ‘Tenor Madness’, classic jazz standard

Sonny Rollins is another great master of tenor saxophone playing. Watch this video clip with Sonny Rollins playing the jazz standard ‘Tenor Madness’ from the bebop tradition. As John Coltrane and Joshua Redman Sonny Rollins too sounds with a lot of energy in his voice. I like it for the subtleness of expression. very dynamic playing and nice soloing.

If you would like to listen to more Sonny Rollins music video clips you can check out the page at fiesta-musical.com.